How does compression work?

Compression is end range strength, it requires both flexibility and strength.


How does this apply to compression garments?
Best support comes from compression garments made from stretchy material, that will retain its elasticity after multiple washes. A compression garment would feel tight but at the same time it must accommodate movement - think of it like running leggings feel against the skin - they support the skin and muscle during a run, but without restricting the movement or the performance of the athlete.


Surgery and the Lymphatic system.
With liposuction procedures the adipose tissue is infiltrated with fluid. Some of this fluid is removed  together with the fat during the liposuction part of the procedure. Volume in = Volume out. The amount of fluid, an equivalent of the volume of fat removed remains behind for the body to reabsorb. This is the job for the lymphatic system. However, the lymphatic system may have suffered damaged vessels during the fat removal procedure. On top of that there is more fluid in the interstitium that it must drain away. The challenge for the lymphatic system here is: it has more fluid to process, but the network of lymph vessels to process the load has been compromised. To help the lymphatic system with such a big job - the wear of compression garments is recommended.


How does compression work?
When the body moves, it does so by using its muscles. If we picture the following as three separate layers:
Layer 1: Muscle
Layer 2: Fat (infiltrated with fluid)
Layer 3: Compression garment - let’s look at this as a “second skin”
Movement of muscle would press the fat against the compression garment (garments have controlled grade stretch). This movement of muscle compressing the fat against the compression garment is what makes swelling move along and promotes lymph drainage.
Lesson to learn: The less mobile you are, the more stiff you will feel, and the longer it will take for your recovery.


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